Tag Archives: energy

Jordanian Women are Shaping the Clean Technology Future – Start by Telling Your Story!


CWEEL Group Pic

I must admit that I’m still learning and triggering thought on Jordan’s knowledge economy potential especially when it comes to the role of women. I also need to state clearly that I’m not a feminist and I believe in Jordanian women’s natural ability to take their part in development shoulder to shoulder with Jordanian men. Every day I encounter a new section of a story that is just beginning. Last week, I had the honor of being the guest speaker in the 2nd meeting for the CWEEL network in Jordan. CWEEL is the Council on Women in Energy and Environmental Leadership and Jordan is initiating its chapter through a few active men and women from the energy and environment sectors.

While I had a presentation ready, I navigated through the eyes of the amazing women attending the event and I suddenly decided to speak from the heart to the heart. Telling my humble story was the gate through which we all entered into an honest discussion that was as inspiring to me as it was to the group. For years, we tend to immerse ourselves in the world of work and lose many opportunities for human interaction.. more importantly for listening to another person’s story. In a personalized story, one can find moments and aspirations that could be life-changing.

My theory of the Clean Tech Sector in Jordan is that it will be shaped by its Women. They are rising like stars in various organizations starting from key business associations and NGOs (EDAMA, Jordan Green Building Council, Architects & Engineers Business Council, etc); Regulatory bodies (Jordan Standards and Metrology Organization), Utility Companies, Research and Academia and Financing Institutions. It is still quite rare to find women business owners or CEOs but this is changing soon, I believe. Getting those women connected and sharing stories together will ensure the sector’s success and growth.

Unlock your potential by sharing your story with another woman. I’m grateful for all the stories that added a special flavor to my life!

 

Green Careers – what are we missing in the educational system?


I was lucky enough to join the Green Careers booth at the International Youth Day celebrations in Irbid organised by USAID. The experience was rich as it made me realise how little environmentalists are doing to empower each other and to give hope to the new green generations. Young Engineering students already had pre expectations that the main challenge in their career is going to be unequal employment opportunities. I had to listen and try to change that perception while inside my head wondered what if that is really the case. After overcoming that first point, we started real talk about:
– the right attitude… What impression am I giving.
– how can I stay up to date with sector development and priorities (energy, environment and water).
– with over 112000 registered engineers in Jordan, how can I build my competitive edge.
– in the CV and during interview, how can I show my added value to the company.
– what would an employer like to see in my CV as a fresh graduate.
– does voluntary work count.

I know I wanted to keep doing this… And reach out to all those feeling its a curse to study green … If I can’t… We all can try though.

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Taqetna (our energy) training for young Jordanians on Renewable Energy


Mahmoud Shattel through his start-up is providing training to Jordanians (undergrads and fresh grads) on renewable energy issues. http://taqetna.com/
I had the pleasure to speak in a couple of their trainings and can’t agree more that we still need to do a lot to get our youth into the energy sector ins and outs.

Ruba speaks at Taqetna training on renewable energy

Jordan’s Green Economy Potential by Ruba Al-Zu’bi


The global financial recession triggered serious debate among many countries in revealing the causes behind failures and in innovating affordable solutions. Seeking “transformational” economic growth is very fashionable nowadays bringing to the front-line clean energy and green investments as keys for a better future. And for those countries at the heart of change in the Arab World, the famous “Spring” is bringing a different flavor to the aspired change and reform.

In Jordan, attention to sustainability (whether environmental or social) is a need as well as a strategic choice. For a country with very limited natural resources and increasingly growing demand, attending for people and environment is not only a political obligation but an under-exploited differentiator that would place Jordan as a regional platform for community-oriented development and sustainable investments.

The known argument of “environment versus investment” should not stay within our dictionary. Both are converging to support development goals especially within a vulnerable environment like ours. The magnified energy crisis that recently hit Jordanians has initiated a paradigm shift in perception and practice. We have never been more aware of the energy cost and the tough budgetary constraints like we are today. I wish I could claim the same for water, another upcoming reality that Jordanians are hardly ready to face.

Learning it the hard way, Jordan is recognizing with no doubt that sustainable development and effective linkages between economic, social and environmental goals, are not attainable without targeting development sectors and mainstreaming sustainability within their plans and operations. The standalone green approach in decision-making is no longer viable as it encapsulates environment away from other development policies and reforms.

The demand for reforms that ensure long-term benefits to the community is dictating an integrated development approach. People need to be conscious about trade-offs and at the heart of the decision-making process. While calling for more jobs and social welfare; Jordanians are becoming more aware of the pressures caused by economic growth on the country’s natural resources. The business and investment climate has its requirements to give back with value added economy. Land, water, energy, infrastructure and good governance are all inputs in the development process; thus, if Jordan is to compete in the market, we should find the right recipe.

Recognizing its untapped resources, Jordan has identified clean energy and green investments as new clusters to boost economic development, provide green jobs, and sustain natural resources. As the first country in the MENA region to conduct a national green economy scoping study, Jordan has identified several opportunities to kick off the green clusters including renewable energy and energy efficiency, water and waste-water management, solid waste, green buildings, ecotourism, transportation etc. However, mainstreaming the green economy potential into those sectors is still limited.

The cost of imported energy amounted to 20% of the GDP (2006). Total imported energy amounted to 96% of Jordan’s total energy needs. The estimated investment needed in the renewable energy sector by 2020 is about 2.1 billion USD and in energy conservation around 152 million USD.

Jordan hopes to generate approximately 1200 MW of electricity from wind projects (BOO basis) and another 600 MW from solar (BOO basis) in addition to 50 MW from waste to energy projects by 2020. This goal is necessary to reach the 10% renewable energy target of the total energy mix.

A major achievement was made recently with the first patch of agreements signed between the government and renewable energy developers to start the first solar and wind power generation projects enabled by the recently issued comprehensive legislative and regulatory framework for renewable energy.

Such investments are expected to contribute to the energy security goals, create green jobs for Jordanians, alleviate burden off the government budget and position Jordan on the clean energy map. As promising as this truly is, Jordan needs to proactively pursue the other elements of the value chain, namely; education, innovation & technology, training, and entrepreneurship. With over 70% of its population under 30 years of age, Jordan’s big investment needs to be in its talent. Mainstreaming the green economy market needs into the education and vocational training systems will enhance the green clusters competitiveness and ensure socioeconomic benefits.

Through building an effective regulatory and governance framework and bringing together public and private sectors as well as civil society organizations; Jordan will establish its competitive edge in the green economy world while striving to meet its people’s development aspirations.

http://www.sharnoffsglobalviews.com/jordan-economy-010/